About Tyler Jefferson

Tyler Jefferson joined Port Phillip Publishing in 2012. With a background in publishing, he started out as part of the team working behind the scenes with your Editors to bring you Money Morning each day.

When he joined, Tyler was Port Phillip Publishing’s 12th employee. Today that number has grown to over 50, as more and more readers turn to Money Morning as their source for independent financial analysis and ideas.

Today as Managing Editor, Tyler still edits the articles you read each day. Along with that, he occasionally contributes to Money Morning with his own irreverent take on the most interesting news and opportunities for you.


Why Bitcoin’s Price Climbed More Than $1,000 Overnight

Bitcoin price riseThe price of bitcoin exploded overnight, rising from US$6,870 (AU$8,859.21) to US$8,034.17 (AU$10,360) in an hour, according to prices quoted from Coindesk. There’s no one specific piece of news that can be pointed to as being solely responsible for the sudden jump. Instead, it seems that a number of factors came together at the same time.

Aussie Banks in the Firing Line

Aussie banks in the firing line with Royal CommissionThis week saw the launch of the Royal Commission into the banking industry. Anything that affects the banks is likely to affect the entire Australian share market. The Commonwealth Bank is Australia’s largest company by market capitalisation. Combined, the banks make up a third of our share market. A loss of confidence could be catastrophic.

How Far Do You Trust the Fed?

US Federal Reserve logo on noteIt was a truly nightmare week on the markets. If you trust the US Fed to be able to smoothly unwind its emergency low-interest rate policy without crashing a market bloated on low rate-driven investment, then you probably aren’t worried. If you don’t have that much faith in the Fed, you might see them as having painted themselves into a corner.

When Fear of Missing Out on Bitcoin Turns to Plain Fear

bitcoin price falling and crashingFirst came the curious. Then as the price rose, the speculators bought in. And in 2017, amidst incredible price rises, massive numbers of new investors bought on the fear of missing out. Those same late-comers have scrambled to get right back out again as the price crashed in January. Their fear of missing out has been transformed into plain old fear.

Free Trade Whether You Like It or Not

free trade agreementHow you or I feel about the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership doesn’t seem to matter, though. Questions, comments and protests have all been ignored by governments of all 11 remaining nations. Trump’s America has chosen the route of isolation and protectionism. A short-sighted path that’s usually far more destructive to jobs, and whole economies, than free trade.

Australia Has Everything Riding on One Bad Bet

Aussie property in declineAustralians, individually and collectively, have bet everything on housing. And every year, we double down on that bet. There’s no certainty that 2018 will be the year our housing gamble goes bust. But it would be madness to be certain that it can’t. Aussie property investors in Australia could be in for a rough year.

Chaos and Opportunity in Bitcoin

bitcoin chaos and opportunitySouth Korea isn’t the first nation to consider banning bitcoin, but it could be the most significant. A large portion of bitcoin’s global demand comes from the country. This isn’t the first time that a major government has threatened to ban it. It likely won’t be the last. Years from now, this may be looked back on as an incredible buying opportunity.

Dogecoin – The Billion Dollar Joke

dogecoinWhile bitcoin was going through a massive pullback in December, another cryptocurrency was smashing records. This tiny crypto saw a 357% gain in just one month. Its market cap blew through a billion US dollars, and shows no signs of slowing. The problem is, it’s a joke.

The True Threat to Aussie Banks

banks biggest threat is blockchain technologyAs long as the big four can comfortably maintain their positions at the heart of Australian finance, it’s unlikely to change. There’s little competition for the big four, outside one another. But that comfortable position may not be as secure as they think.