Eurozone Economy

Here at Money Morning, we cover the section of the Eurozone Economy regularly.

In the everchanging and dramatic environment of the EU, it’s important to keep an eye on the latest news and updates that may create waves for us Aussies back home…

Luckily for you, we do all the hard work, searching for the latest and delivering it to you here.

As you may already know, the Eurozone includes 19 countries that have fully incorporated the euro as their national currency — Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.

It’s one of the largest economic regions in the world.

The EU, as we know it, was created in 1992, with the signing of the Maastricht Treaty by all countries making up the European Community (EC).

The purpose of the EU was to create a unified economic and monetary union with a central banking system (the European Central Bank — ECB) and a single common currency…

The euro.

To this day, the euro is one of the most liquid currencies and holds a prominent position in the reserves of many central banks.

And the EU not only created a unified currency, but created significant change to citizenship, security and defence policy, as well as economic policy.

But it hasn’t been easy sailing since 1992 — there are a few holes in the Eurozone.

You would be well aware by now of the number of significant changes the EU has experienced, most notably Britain’s referendum decision two years ago.

With the ongoing issues of the immigration crisis, a growing distrust of multinational financial, trade and defence organisations — the pressing issues that the EU failed to solve — Britain decided to claim their sovereignty.

The EU is not a nationalistic power — it attempts to retain nationality as a cultural right, and yet it deprives individual nations of the power to make crucial decisions.

But soon, Britain may not be the only ones to up and leave the Eurozone…

What happens next could create a ripple effect of consequences for Australia and your overseas investments.

Read on for the latest news and updates regarding the Eurozone economy.

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