Global Economy

The global economy, at a basic level, refers to the exchange of goods and services around the world.

Global economic conditions, trade and capital flows have substantial implications for the Australian economy, and for Australia’s regional trading partners.

Understanding the broad trends, emerging challenges and opportunities that exist within the global economy is crucial.

Lucky for you, our editors and analysts at Money Morning cover this section daily.

The modern global economy became highly integrated following the 2008 global financial crisis, a great example as to explain the interconnectedness of the world economic system.

What first began as a localised problem within the residential asset-backed securities market in the US, eventually saw the fall of major financial firms across the Western world, and ultimately pushed the US and Europe into a deep and prolonged recession.

Although global economic growth has somewhat recovered since then, it is still much lower than pre-2008 trends. The hangover remaining from the crisis has caused high unemployment levels and inequality throughout much of the developing world.

More recently, the Chinese economy has started to rise to a global power, and India and Indonesia have become major players in the global economy.

It’s important to pay attention to these changing trends to protect yourself and your assets.

For the latest international economic news covering international markets, trade, stock markets, investment trends and more, read on…

Markets Get Nothing from Santa This Year

The end of 2018 could have potentially signalled then end of the bull market. A Santa rally is almost certainly well and truly out of the question. So what does this mean for markets in 2019?

EU Breakup to Shake Markets Next Year?

The political disruption going on in Europe could be a defining moment of 2019. But while it might push stocks prices around (in the short-term), you shouldn’t let it dictate where you invest in the new year.

Uranium Market Draws on new Strength

Output of the global uranium market has dropped off in 2018 against growing demand in Asia, which is driving prices higher. A low price environment has also caused major uranium producers to suspend production, which has helped lift prices to fix the supply and demand imbalance.
Money Morning Australia